Saturday, 29 November 2014

6 reasons to ditch that phone in a meeting!

Travis Bradberry gives six things having the phone with you in a meeting communicates about you: 
1. Lack of respect. It says you consider your phone to be more important than the conversation or topic at hand. 
2. Lack of attention. It communicates that you are unable to stay focused on one thing at a time.

3. Lack of listening. You are not practicing active listening when you are with your phone. So no one around you feels heard. 
4. Lack of power. You are like a modern-day Pavlovian dog who responds to the whims of others through the buzz of your phone. 
5. Lack of self-awareness. You don't understand how ridiculous your behavior looks to other people. 
6. Lack of social awareness. You don't understand how your behavior affects those around you.
From an article written by Travis Bradberry (Linkedin Pulse). Apparently researchers conducted a USA nationwide survey of 554 full-time working professionals earning above $30K and working in companies with at least 50 employees. They asked a variety of questions about smartphone use during meetings. They found around 85% think it’s inappropriate to answer phone calls, write texts or emails during meetings. Interesting, the more money people make the less they approve of smartphone use.

Copyright © Chola Mukanga 2014

Friday, 28 November 2014

The invisibility challenge

He is the image of the invisible God
I have long been fascinated by the challenge of invisibility. One of the things people say when you discuss with the question of God with them is that there’s no evidence for God. Usually what they mean is that God is not physically obvious to them. God is not something that they can feel and touch so they struggle to accept that he exists.

Wednesday, 26 November 2014

Importance of routine

Barack Obama on the importance of routine:
You need to remove from your life the day-to-day problems that absorb most people for meaningful parts of their day… You’ll see I wear only grey or blue suits. I’m trying to pare down decisions. I don’t want to make decisions about what I’m eating or wearing. Because I have too many other decisions to make. You need to focus your decision-making energy. You need to routinize yourself. You can’t be going through the day distracted by trivia. (Source: Vanity Fair)
This is great advice on how to ensure that we keep our focus on things that matter and reduce the level of stress in our lives. Much of stress in our lives derives from having to make countless small decisions about things that have minimal importance. These things should at best be routine to reduce inefficient use of time.

Saturday, 22 November 2014

Seven Tips on Delegation

1. Never sit on work - delegate it as a soon as possible. The later you leave it to delegate to someone else, the more disruption you are causing to the rest of his or her work.

2. Allow a buffer when setting a deadline. Always allow a suffient buffer to give you time to chase the work if it late without throwing you into emergency situation

3. Be specific. Always be quite clear about what you want done and by when. Make it clear that you expect the deadline to be met.

4. Give intermediate deadlines. Intermediate deadlines increase the likelihood of a project being completed on time, It also increases the quality of the finished work.

5. Remind before a deadline. A day or so before an intermediate or final deadline, issue a reminder that you are expecting the work back on the deadline.

6. Follow up immediately. If the person misses the deadline, you must follow up immediately. If they don't hear from you they may think it doesn't matter.

7. Don't listen to excuses. Make it clear that you are not interested in why a deadline has been missed. You are interested only in when the work will be completed. Focus on that point exclusively. Make them give you a new completition date and hold them to it.

The points are taken from 'Do It Tomorrow' by Mark Foster. The actual points in the book are slightly longer of the above points are very sound. The book have incredible insights on how to be more productive with time.

Copyright © Chola Mukanga 2014

Thursday, 13 November 2014

Tragedy of the eyes

For all that is in the world—the desires of the flesh and the desires of the eyes and pride of life —is not from the Father but is from the world.
I  recent came across the story of a British woman who died during cosmetic surgery at a clinic in Thailand. The 24-year-old was said to have been undergoing a procedure by an allegedly uncertified surgeon in Bangkok before her death. The British Association of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons said, “This tragic case highlights how, if lured by the prospect of what is essentially ‘cheap surgery’, patients can be left vulnerable.”