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ABOUT

Welcome to my blog!  My name is Chola Mukanga, and I like to read and write!  I am married to Eunice and we are grateful to God for the gift of Abigail. I am currently serving as Pastor of Grace Baptist Church Bexleyheath in London. 

I am also an economist with a never-ending  interest in the history of economic thought, information, justice and transport and development economics.  When  I had more I time I used to write regularly on my other blog - Zambian Economist.

I started Lost Pages to help me think through questions about life that interests me from a Christian perspective. The blog is called Lost Pages because it is an attempt to record the "lost pages" of my life. Thoughts and ideas which form a fabric of my life, but which I usually lose or forget, unless I write them down. 

If you have a passion for thinking about the interface between faith and life or have any questions regarding anything posted here, please feel free to drop me an email :  chola.mukanga@lost-pages.com 

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Man of Sorrows, King of Glory (A Review)

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