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Let in the Light

A man was walking then he came across a house, where he saw the owner of the house, Barney, breaking a large hole in the wall of an old cellar. So he asked him, ‘what are you doing’? The answer of Barney was prompt, ‘Sir, I'm letting out the dark’.  We spend much time and energy in the same foolish idea. We attack the dark, instead of putting all our powers into the glorious work of letting in the light. Whether the darkness is uncivilised ignorance, or infidel prejudice, let us shine in the light of the glorious Gospel, and the darkness will fly.

WILLIAM LUFF 

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