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What is the safest place on earth?

It is certainly not the White House. Earlier this week I read that there has been a staggering 35 breaches of the White House perimeter since the mid 1970s. The latest incident involves a decorated Iraq War veteran who scaled a fence on last Friday night and got into the White House. It was later reported that he had more than 800 rounds of ammunition in his car and was arrested in July with a sniper rifle and a map marking the executive mansion.

In truth, there is no place on earth that is truly safe because the safety of the place depends on the people who protects it. The Great Wall of China is thousands of miles long, 30 feet high, and 18 feet thick and was built as security against the northern invaders. It is a massive construction, and was intended to be impenetrable. In fact, impressive as it was, the wall was breached not by physically breaking the wall down but by a simple ruse: the gatekeepers were bribed.

A fortress is is only as strong as the people protecting it. An economy is only as strong as the people working in it; a business is only as strong as its staff; an army is only as strong as its soldiers. We can build walls to protect us, but walls are as strong (or as weak) as the humans that guard them. This is also true for automated security systems. They are only as good as their designers.

The question of personal safety and security is therefore not so much about “what is the safest place on earth” but “who is the safest person on earth”? The correct answer is that the safest person is one who has infinite power in their lives. Such power can withstand any foe. Remarkably the Bible says followers of the Lord Jesus Christ have this infinite power in them. Apostle Paul writing to a local church at Ephesus shares this prayer for them:
I pray that the eyes of your heart may be enlightened in order that you may know the hope to which [God] has called you...and his incomparably great power for us who believe. That power is the same as the mighty strength he exerted when he raised Christ from the dead and seated him at his right hand in the heavenly realms, far above all rule and authority, power and dominion, and every name that is invoked, not only in the present age but also in the one to come. And God placed all things under his feet and appointed him to be head over everything for the church, which is his body, the fullness of him who fills everything in every way (Ephesians 1:18-21]
God’s immeasurable power has been made available to anyone who believes in Jesus Christ. This power cannot be measured. It is not like the White House or the great wall of China. It is limitless because God personally guarantees this power. In fact this power is the same power that raised the Lord Jesus from the dead and enabled him to defeat all powers and authority. It is the same power he is using to govern all things.

But notice how this power is available, it is not just given, it is embodied in a person. Namely Jesus, who now exercises it for believers or “for the church”. The power is not distant it is in fact near because Jesus is the head of the church. So what is the safest place on earth? It is God’s church in the Lord Jesus Christ. If you are in Jesus you are safe and secure.

Copyright © Chola Mukanga 2013

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