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Slipping

It’s scary when you’re slipping
And there’s no one there to catch you
In fact they catch a glimpse of you
And start to welcome you back
And with a heart caught between
Two situations
You begin to take in their semi-compliments
Like ‘you’re finally back to being you’
‘Remember that time when you were getting a bit dry
But now we’re all cool’
Cool is the last thing you feel
This is what you call a dry spell
And whilst they sing your praises
Saying ‘You’re so spiritual’
You remember that time when the tensions were so high
That they would verbally outcry against your faith
Ironically against ‘their own faith’
Too spiritual, tone it down they say,
But now as they open their arms in acceptance
You stand ashamed because you’re the one whose changed
Toned down the preaching of Christ’s almighty name
Just to be accepted
Everything to lose, nothing to gain
Just to be accepted
But now it’s different, your soul can see two inscriptions
The spiritual and the worldly
Godless and the godly
The clarity and discernment is absolutely
Killing you
Because you refuse to move
Like a sheep in wolves’ clothing
You’re at risk but suddenly of no use.

It’s scary when you’re slipping
And there’s no one there to catch you…but God
In fact He caught a glimpse of you before the fall
And started to welcome you back
And with a heart caught between
Two situations
You realise that their semi-compliments
Should have no effect on the reverence you feel towards Him
And now you’re fully back to being you
But you do remember the time when they thought you were dry
But it was cool because your trust in God was growing daily
And you took the phrase of being ‘too spiritual’
As unintentional praise
And hoped that your faith wouldn’t be mistaken
For a phase
Yes you were the one who changed
By Grace, you are were the one whose changed
Eager to preach His name
Longing not to fear the chains
Nothing to lose, everything to gain
A soul that sees two inscriptions
And hungers to choose the spiritual over the worldly.

ERHUNMWUN IGHODARO

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