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The Unconditional Prayer of the Utterly Serious

Lord God, my singular ambition in life is to magnify you. I care not what the cost; spend me as you please. On your arrangements I place no conditions. You set the terms of my service. My prayer is simply that you ordain for my life whatever will glorify Christ most through me.

If my Savior would be honored more through my death than my life, more in sickness than in health, more in poverty than in wealth, more through loneliness than companionship, more by the appearance of failure than by the trappings of success, more by anonymity than by notoriety, then your design is my desire.

Only let me make a difference
A prayer from Jim Andrews' good, if heartbreaking read,  Polishing God's Monuments. I recently read the book after languishing for over six months on my Kindle. How glad I did. The book tells the true story of Jim's daughter and her devoted husband who face it all (and then some) as a baffling, mind-boggling illness hijacks their youth and shatters their dreams. The book wonderfully blends story telling with theological reflections. It is very helpful that the story is told by Jim because it allows the reader a deeper vantage point of Father, Pastor and Christian. A very helpful to everyone, especially those struggle with illness or some other challenge. 

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